2219 West Danby Road, West Danby NY 14883

2219 West Danby Road, West Danby NY 14883

607.269.7171

 journeyofhopecounselingcenter@gmail.com

9

Abuse (physical, emotional, sexual)

9

Addictions

9

Anger

9

Anxiety & Depression

9

Children & Adolescents

9

Co-Dependency

9

Grief & Loss

9

Guilt

9

Marriage & Family Life

9

Mood Swings

9

OCD

9

Self-Esteem & Identity Issues

9

Trauma & PTSD

9

Abuse (physical, emotional, sexual)

9

Addictions

9

Anger

9

Anxiety & Depression

9

Children & Adolescents

9

Co-Dependency

9

Grief & Loss

9

Guilt

9

Marriage & Family Life

9

Mood Swings

9

OCD

9

Self-Esteem & Identity Issues

9

Trauma & PTSD

Above is a basic list of therapeutic interventions we provide. Although this is not an exhaustive list, we are able to treat more issues than what may be listed. We feel these are the major areas of mental health and relational issues most people struggle with.

Good therapy is all about helping the person seeking help to feel better, to make healthy decisions and set healthy boundaries, to move from a place of poor emotional health to good emotional health, to make connections with others, and to replace sadness, anxiety, anger, and frustration with happiness, peace, and hopefulness for the future.

Most states and other regions require that therapists or counselors meet specific education and training requirements. Though these vary from location to location, all therapists must be educated, trained, and must follow basic professional codes of ethics and guidelines.

At Journey of Hope counseling Center it is a requirement that all of our counselors must have a minimum of a Masters Degree in counseling (or a closely related field) from an accredited academic institution, and licensed in the state of NY or currently working toward their Masters and licensure.

We believe the foundation for good therapy exists when your therapist is trained appropriately and meets local and/or state guidelines for providing a professional counseling environment.

Here are the major things we consider to be of great importance

  • Training/credentials, experience, and professionalism
  • A biblical view of life as it relates to counseling and therapy
  • Informed consent, confidentiality and other legal issues
  • Communication and client focus
  • Empathy and the therapeutic relationship
  • Ongoing progress

Below you will find basic explanations of the top three areas of mental health issues. When we understand the basics of our condition it helps us move through the therapeutic process.

Abuse (physical, emotional, sexual)

Abuse—physical, verbal, or emotional maltreatment—can leave psychological wounds that are harder to heal than bodily injuries. Survivors of abuse may find it challenging to cope with the intense, often negative feelings that can plague them long after the abuse has ended, and their ability to find peace and happiness in life may be affected.

Distressing memories, anxiety, blocks to intimacy, and trust issues are common in people who have experienced abuse, although many are able to overcome or minimize challenges like these with the help of a qualified mental health professional.

Types of Abuse

All types of abuse can cause pain and psychological distress. It is not uncommon for a victim of abuse to experience more than one type of abuse. Someone who was sexually abusedmay have also experienced concurrent emotional abuse, for example. Abuse can occur within any relationship construct, whether familial, professional, or social, and it can also occur between strangers.

Many forms of abuse are in fact abuses of power, in which a person repeatedly attempts to control or manipulate the behavior of another person. Emotional or psychological abuse can include a chronic pattern of criticism, coercion, humiliation, accusation, or threats to one’s physical safety, and childhood neglect is also a form of psychological abuse

Addictions

An addiction—A persistent need to consume a substance or commit an act—is distinct from a compulsion, which is an overwhelming and irresistible impulse to act. Usually, a compulsive act is preceded by obsessive, intrusive thoughts that compel the person to act, whereas an addiction is more of a habit that is not necessarily accompanied by obsessive thinking. An individual experiencing either addiction or compulsions may find it helpful to speak to a mental health professional.

Identifying Signs and Symptoms

Compulsive behaviors include chronic gambling, alcohol and substance abuse, sexual addictions, unrestrained shopping and spending, hoarding, excessive exercising, Internet gaming, eating issues, and other behaviors. Any compulsive behavior can become an addiction when the act is no longer able to be controlled and impairs a person’s ability to function socially, academically, and professionally. The distinction between “addiction” and “compulsion” can sometimes become unclear, as a person might think frequently about the object of the addiction, and it may become near-compulsive to pursue the addictive behavior.

Anxiety & Depression

Anxiety Can mean nervousness, worry, or self-doubt. Sometimes, the cause of anxiety is easy to spot, while other times it may not be. Everyone feels some level of anxiety once in a while. But overwhelming, recurring, or “out of nowhere” dread can deeply impact people. When anxiety interferes like this, talking to a therapist can help.

Signs and Symptoms of Anxiety

Diagnosing anxiety depends on a person’s feelings of worry, so symptoms will vary. Personality, co-occurring mental health conditions, and other factors may explain a person’s symptoms. Anxiety can cause intrusive or obsessive thoughts. A person with anxiety may feel confused or find it hard to concentrate. Feeling restless or frustrated can also be a sign of anxiety. Other people with anxiety may feel depressed. Symptoms of anxiety can also be physical. Anxiety can cause overly tense muscles, or high blood pressure. Trembling, sweating, a racing heartbeat, dizziness, and insomnia can also come from anxiety. Anxiety may even cause headaches, digestive problems, difficulty breathing, and nausea.

What Does Anxiety Look Like? People can show signs of anxiety in many ways. Some may become more talkative, while others withdraw or self-isolate. Even people who seem outgoing, friendly, or fearless can have anxiety. Since anxiety has many symptoms, how it looks for one person is not how it appears for another.

People who have anxiety may be withdrawn, but this is not the case for everyone with anxiety. Sometimes, anxiety may trigger a “fight” rather than “flight” response, in which case a person might appear confrontational. Stumbling over words, trembling, and nervous tics are often associated with anxiety. While they can appear in people with anxiety, they are not always present, and some people who do not have anxiety also show these signs.

Journey of Hope Counseling Center is a service provided by the First Baptist Church of West Danby

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